Recruiting In 3D

Maybe Size Doesn’t Matter

I spent the vast majority of my career thus far, working in small to mid-size companies. I always carried a bit of trepidation about working for multi-national conglomerates, so I stayed in my comfort zone. In retrospect, this wasn’t unlike how I chose where I was going to go to college back in the day. I was hesitant to go to a huge school and sit in a lecture hall with 500 strangers, mainly since I came from a smaller high school. Something about being lost in a sea of bodies was particularly offsetting to me, and this carried into my career.

Living in a Small Pond

Working in small companies, I had the chance to know my co-workers on a more personal level. It was also more comfortable to build relationships and move things through the decision tree process. If I needed to prod something along in Tech for a recruiting effort, going to the CTO and sitting down for coffee was as easy as me typing on this keyboard. In essence, the access was always there.

If I had technical issues, I’d parade myself down one floor to the support team and get the help of people whom I’d most likely sourced and hired into the company. One could liken it to the FastPass at Disney parks – straight to the front of the line. The same can be said for any system and procedural issues, whether that is a busted CRM, a benefits data snafu, or just getting office supplies, it was all at my fingertips.

The flip side of this, of course, is that with visibility comes accountability. There’s nowhere to hide in a small company when you mess up. You have to own it because there isn’t anyone else to pin it on. It seems trivial, and in most cases, I felt that was a good thing because it kept me on my game.

Moving to a Large Pond

When I finally decided to make a move to one of the world’s largest companies, I’ll admit I was a little scared. Would I get lost in the sea of endless employees? How would I distinguish myself from every other sourcer in the same role? I became a “level” instead of “Pete, the guy who does the tech recruiting.”

Most importantly, I was afraid I would find out that I wasn’t nearly as good at what I did for a living as I thought. Maybe I’d been in a safe space for too long. Regardless of my fears, it was time to take the plunge and see where this led me.

What I found was that accountability still matters. Relationships, while harder to build at depth with so many people, still matter in doing your job. There’s a level of self-sustainability that comes with being in a large company. You’re expected to find answers, seek help, and navigate things a bit more on your own, which is a refreshing reminder of how to rely on yourself instead of others. You have a bit more hands-on influence on your career path and opportunities, based on the size of the organization.

And while your employee number may resemble something that looks more like Pi than an area code, you start to realize the things you can do when you’re empowered to do so. For a sourcer, this is one of the better puzzles to have to solve.

So, if you’re in a state of doubt, thinking “should I” or “shouldn’t I,” take the leap, so you don’t keep guessing at the outcome. You’re more capable than you think. And if all else fails, you can always migrate back to the small pond.

*This article first appeared on SourceCon*

LivingSocial: When Networks And Culture Actually Work.

The terms “network” and “networking” have a rather nebulous definition, dependingon who you ask; of course, for so many in our spam infested, hypersocial and intrinsically interconnected world, “networking” involves something as simple clicking on a friend or connection request online.

Ross ArbesFor others still, “networking” involves attending an in person event, where it’s often just easier to quaff a few cold ones and eat some finger foods while standing around making awkward shop talk than it is to go home and bathe the kids or pay the bills.

At the end of the day, what “networking” actually is can get a little bit murky, given the fact that pretty much everyone has a different definition. Consequently, what we should be doing to effectively build our “networks” becomes increasingly opaque and obtuse, too.

The fact that we can’t even agree on a universal definition of this ubiquitous concept underscores the fact that making your network work works differently for everyone – that is, if they even work at all.  Read More

Once In A (Recruiting) Lifetime: This is 40

As I sit here, dedicating a few of my first full 24 hours as a 40 year old to this post, I realize that I’d spent the last four days figuring out what the hell, exactly, I wanted to write.

After all, as you know, our editor is something of a stickler for meaty editorial content (to say the least), and has an expectation for quality that can sometimes be hard to meet – particularly when you have something to say, but you just aren’t quite sure how to say it.

Because frankly, hitting 40 is kind of heavy, at least judging from the past few hours of introspection, soul searching and second guessing.

It’s not so much that, statistically speaking, my life is half over (give or take a few years and a lot of luck), or because I’m having some sort of existential mid-life crisis. Seriously. I’m sure that, were things a little different, I’d be out there test driving sports cars, signing up for skydiving lessons or whatever the hell it is men of my age generally do when they hit the big 4-0.

But as much fun as that stuff sounds, the thing is, personally and professionally, as I turn 40, I’m truly in a good place. I know how lucky I am to be fulfilled in both fronts, and even though I’m now in the next decade, I know, somehow, the best is yet to come. Read More

Top Recruiter: Reality Bites

Well, my friends – I suppose it was inevitable. After all, for years we’ve been hearing recruiters use stupid superlatives and specious self-descriptors like “rock star,” “ninja” or (gag) “guru.” And oddly enough, not ironically, either. 

Now, we can finally add “reality TV star” to that little list as well (if, of course, you use a really liberal definition of the words TV and star, that is).

Top Recruiter is here, and well…it’s here. Read More

Why Giving Notice Matters

Welcome to 2015, and another year of unlimited possibilities and opportunities. Among these opportunities, for many people, landing a new job is by far one of the most exhilarating feelings one can experience. With this new job so many possibilities are abound: a fresh start, higher pay, more responsibility and/or management potential, and a whole new world of challenges to be taken head-on. It’s understandable why people are excited and why they immediately turn focus to their new future surroundings.

However, too often people make the mistake of leaving their old job without sufficient (or any) notice period to their employer. This is a tragic, yet wholly avoidable mistake. Again, it’s entirely understandable that excitement really takes over, but it is equally as important that you keep in mind the long-term ramifications of leaving a job without proper notice. Read More

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