Recruiting In 3D

Between The Lines: What Facebook Jobs Really Means for Real Recruiters.

If you’re in recruiting, I’m sure that by now you’re probably aware of the fact that as of last week, Facebook officially announced that they would be rolling out the ability for facebook-vs-linkedin-e1487725165620-300x251 (1)employers to post jobs on their Company Pages.

While this feature has been in beta for some months now, last week’s long awaited announcement marked the first public confirmation that Zuck & Co. was officially moving into the already crowded online recruiting space.

Facebook’s move into job postings has proven to be a contentious topic among many in the recruiting industry; some see a sourcing silver bullets, others pure anathema.

It will obviously take some time to determine whether Facebook’s most recent move towards world domination will make any sort of meaningful impact on the way candidates find jobs, and companies find candidates – or whether the platform will quickly go the way of Branchout, BeKnown by Monster, or any of the dozens of attempts to transform Facebook into a viable recruiting solution that ended, unilaterally, in abject failure.

As a tech recruiting leader, I remain cautiously optimistic about Facebook’s foray into talent acquisition. The fact that I’m actually a practitioner, responsible for filling reqs, is simultaneously also what’s causing me to approach this new offering with some skepticism.

Over the years, I’ve seen a ton of recruiting tools that were purportedly going to change the world of recruiting, and yet, ultimately, our world is more or less the same as it ever was.

So, while I’m excited about the prospect of Facebook finally getting into the recruiting game, I think that my cautious approach of “show me, don’t tell me is imminently justified (and rightfully expected). Read More

Mix It Up: Why It’s Finally Time To Combine Sourcing and Recruiting For Good.

Over the years, one of the many things I’ve given quite a bit of thought to is the relationship between recruiting and sourcing, and how these functions fit in with the311 bigger talent acquisition picture. At first glance (for those outside our industry), we all pretty much look the same.

You know what I’m talking about – the whole (not uncommon) “recruiters suck” sentiment that’s so persistent for so many hiring managers and job seekers alike.

But a closer look reveals infinitely more nuance. When you really take time to examine the details of sourcing and recruiting, there are a few disparate tasks and tactics, but there are also a ton of pieces that tend to overlap. This leads to an interesting question:

Why do so talent organizations treat these two similar roles as separate (and often unequal) functions?

Before I try to answer that question, let me take a minute to explain why I wanted to address this particular topic. Read More

Learn To Live Without LinkedIn And Attend More Events In 2017

2017-700x467

Don’t you just love New Year’s and the fresh, clean slate that it brings you? January means new beginnings and a full 365 days of continual self-improvement, right? Yeah, me neither.

But a new year does mean new budgets, new searches to work on, and a whole new set of market changes and challenges. Which means that you’ll need to keep fine tuning your arsenal of tools, and stay on top of what’s being talked about in the market.

And I know, you’re already thinking “I don’t have time for more.” Well, that may well be true, but the only disservice you do is to yourself if you ignore your professional development. So, in the spirit of fresh starts, here’s a few things to put on your to-do list for 2017. You may not get to them all, but start with just one and take it from there. Read More

Reports Of the Death of Recruiting Have Been Greatly Exaggerated.

In case you hadn’t heard, it turns out that recruiting is dead (or dying, or going extinct, or some similarly dire prediction) – or at least that’s many of the recruiting pundits and prognosticators out there seem to believe.marktwain_cc_img_0-768x475

Of course, this industry has always looked at the world with a Chicken Little sort of mentality, perpetually holding onto the belief that the sky must be falling.

Look no further than your social feed, and surely you’ve seen at least a few examples of what’s become an entire genre of predicting the demise of traditional jobs, the obsolescence of sourcing and recruiting, and, of course, the rise of the robots poised inevitably (and invariably) to replace recruiters and hiring managers with algorithms and AI and automation, and so forth.

You know the drill by now.

Because while this sort of doomsday scenario inevitably drives eyeballs, clickthroughs and conversions, even the most confrontational content around this perpetual talent trending topic is starting to feel a bit tired, lazy and hackneyed. After all, we’ve been predicting the demise of recruiting for as long as I can pretty much remember, and somehow, we’re not only still here… Read More

The Way Buying Should Be: Evaluating HR Technology

It’s confusing to me how we go through more than thirteen years of education without hrt1learning things we’ll need for the rest of our life – how to do our taxes, budgeting, how to get a loan, etc. We learn calculus and biology before we’re taught what we really need to get by and do well for ourselves. There are a lot of things we have to do in this world of adulting that we never get trained on if we don’t have parents who can teach us how to do them.

Buying technology, like a new car, is one of the many practical things we’re never taught in school. We go through life with check lists and blogs, scattered information comparing one thing to the next and trying to make the best decisions possible based on reviews. That’s why reviews are so popular in the first place, because we aren’t taught what to look for or how to be a better buyer.

It’s a lot like recruiting. In our job, there’s no specific education pipeline to teach us what to buy or why as compared to a more technical path where they’re taught every step of the job before ever leaving college. Unlike an engineer, we’re often left aimlessly wandering to decide priorities and how-to’s  in the school of the hard knocks. We don’t know everything we need to know before we start on this recruiting career path. One area we struggle the most to make good decisions? Technology. Read More

%d bloggers like this: