It’s confusing to me how we go through more than thirteen years of education without hrt1learning things we’ll need for the rest of our life – how to do our taxes, budgeting, how to get a loan, etc. We learn calculus and biology before we’re taught what we really need to get by and do well for ourselves. There are a lot of things we have to do in this world of adulting that we never get trained on if we don’t have parents who can teach us how to do them.

Buying technology, like a new car, is one of the many practical things we’re never taught in school. We go through life with check lists and blogs, scattered information comparing one thing to the next and trying to make the best decisions possible based on reviews. That’s why reviews are so popular in the first place, because we aren’t taught what to look for or how to be a better buyer.

It’s a lot like recruiting. In our job, there’s no specific education pipeline to teach us what to buy or why as compared to a more technical path where they’re taught every step of the job before ever leaving college. Unlike an engineer, we’re often left aimlessly wandering to decide priorities and how-to’s  in the school of the hard knocks. We don’t know everything we need to know before we start on this recruiting career path. One area we struggle the most to make good decisions? Technology. Read More

I had the opportunity to spend some time with my colleague, Lorne Epstein and a few guests to debate the core principles of the Massachusetts salary law, and it’s effect on the recruiting industry.

Take a listen, hope you enjoy. I promise to dress up the next time I’m on the radio.

 

 

 

 

When Massachusetts enacted their law prohibiting employers from asking for or requiringtumblr_inline_mvven1z1lf1rg0g8s  the salary history of a candidate, there was a great deal of consternation. Even though the law does not take effect until July 2018, the immediate buzz is loud. Many recruiters are panicking in fear that this legislation may well catch on and become the proverbial law of the land. You can count me among those that find this incredibly disturbing. Read More

Ah, college. It’s where so many of those “this one time..” stories start, unless you attend a screen-shot-2016-09-01-at-10-33-10-amlot of open bar HR conference happy hours, of course. College is the place where you start to learn your story – personally and professionally. You being to refine those dreams and realize that maybe you don’t want to be a doctor or lawyer after all.

Upon graduation, 5 or more years later for most kids, you’re responsible for telling that story. For translating all of your learning and “work experience,” or lack thereof, into a cohesive and coherent resume. Of course, up to this point – you’ve never been taught to write a resume in the first place so your resume advice comes from an array of sources: family, friends, the Internet, of course. But many colleges also offer another resource, your college career center.

The first resume advice many of us get from an actual human is from that college career counselor. They’re supposed to be experts on careers, after all, and at the low price of $0 (if you ignore the tens of thousands you’ve already paid for college), they’re worth it.

I can almost hear the recruiters cringing now, especially those of us who have looked at a thousand resumes with the same formatting. The same mistakes. In general, we have a bit of mistrust towards these guys, often 20 plus year tenured veterans of the career counseling department. Our hesitance is valid considering they haven’t actually applied for a job since faxing in your resume was a thing at most companies. Read More

There is a pervasive thought among technical candidates these days that the recruiters who are contacting them for opportunities haven’t got a clue as to what they are doing. And, by and large, they are absolutely correct. After all, we’re recruiters, and we’re in a profession that has little to no barrier to entry.

While it’s been proven that with the right amount of (correct) training, strong recruiters can be built in the model of nurture over nature, it doesn’t happen by osmosis. So what can we do in order to help prepare ourselves better to speak with technical candidates? Because doing so will not only help us recruit better and build a stronger rapport with candidates, but will indirectly have a positive impact on your company’s recruiting brand.  Read More

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