Recruiting In 3D

I Get By With a Little Help From My…Hiring Manager

A great many sourcing discussions start with or involve some talk of candidate engagement. There are countless viewpoints on the best methods of outreach (how’s that Tik-Tok thing going?) and the best ways to get the talent we want to respond to our craftily worded messages.

The truth is, sometimes, despite the best research, the funniest meme, or the bullet point choices to get them to give you any response, it just won’t get it done. People who are talented have options. Lots of them. The sheer volume of messages they are getting is staggering and exhausting for them. And it’s time-consuming to parse through all the noise to get to the good ones.

Sometimes we just need some additional help. Someone with a different perspective, who can add an extra option to get the person to respond. Enter your hiring manager. (For the purposes of this post, we’ll assume you’ve got a hiring manager who is willing to play ball and help you out with some messages. If they aren’t, I’m sorry. And that’s a whole other post.) Read More

5 Simple Ways to Enhance Your Sourcing Engagement

In the day to day world of sourcing (or any line of work, really), we’re often inundated with a “to-do” list that is overwhelming and stressful. Seeing as we’re all human and prone to mistakes when we’re overloaded, we can often make mistakes in our messaging that can derail any candidate engagement before it even has a chance to blossom.

Attention to detail matters in our world, and small mistakes can have not-so-small consequences downstream. So here are some things you can start immediately implementing in your processes to ensure you stand out.

What’s in a Name?

This is the easiest one to control. We’ve found the person we want to reach out to, and have identified a plethora of platforms where they have a profile for us to gather information from. Yet, too often, names get misspelled or the wrong name is put in the message altogether. Those messages are often discarded before they are even read, and that effort is wasted. Take the extra second to make sure you’ve spelled the name right. Additionally, if someone uses a nickname on all their profiles, you should have a reasonable level of comfort using that name. For example, if a candidate uses “Steve” on all their profiles, it doesn’t make a ton of sense for one to approach that person with “Hi Steven”.

People misspell my name all the time, even when it is part of my ...

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WTF is THAT? Staying Curious While Sourcing

I’m a curious person by nature. I’m not generally satisfied with what’s on the back flap of the book – I want to know what’s inside. I’ve also lost more than one laptop to this curiosity. I, like many sourcers, was one of those kids who broke their toys as a kid to see if they could figure out how to put them back together. About half the time, the answer was “yes”, I could put them back together. The other half resulted in my mother asking things like “why is there a half melted G.I. Joe figure on the light bulb?” As you’d assume, I gave a plethora of answers to these questions, but no answer I’d give would ever suffice. This carried into my professional life, and as a sourcer, this innate curiosity has served me well.

As sourcers, we’re researchers at heart when you think about it. We can come up with a thousand ways to dissect profiles, absorb trends, siphon copious amounts of data off of public (and some not-so-public) websites and apps. But many of us seem to falter in an area that, while a little left of center of our core duties, is essential to our success. We can’t speak to technology as adeptly as we should be able to. We fail frequently to glean ample insight into the technology being used by those candidates we so covet.

The argument here for some may be that they don’t interact with candidates often, or at all. And while a firm grasp of specific technology talking points may be slightly more beneficial to those who are talking with candidates each day, those of us doing pure research can also benefit as well. By understanding the landscape of the technology we’re searching for, we are able to find similar, translatable skill sets that can meet the needs of the teams you are supporting. Read More

Maybe Size Doesn’t Matter

I spent the vast majority of my career thus far, working in small to mid-size companies. I always carried a bit of trepidation about working for multi-national conglomerates, so I stayed in my comfort zone. In retrospect, this wasn’t unlike how I chose where I was going to go to college back in the day. I was hesitant to go to a huge school and sit in a lecture hall with 500 strangers, mainly since I came from a smaller high school. Something about being lost in a sea of bodies was particularly offsetting to me, and this carried into my career.

Living in a Small Pond

Working in small companies, I had the chance to know my co-workers on a more personal level. It was also more comfortable to build relationships and move things through the decision tree process. If I needed to prod something along in Tech for a recruiting effort, going to the CTO and sitting down for coffee was as easy as me typing on this keyboard. In essence, the access was always there.

If I had technical issues, I’d parade myself down one floor to the support team and get the help of people whom I’d most likely sourced and hired into the company. One could liken it to the FastPass at Disney parks – straight to the front of the line. The same can be said for any system and procedural issues, whether that is a busted CRM, a benefits data snafu, or just getting office supplies, it was all at my fingertips.

The flip side of this, of course, is that with visibility comes accountability. There’s nowhere to hide in a small company when you mess up. You have to own it because there isn’t anyone else to pin it on. It seems trivial, and in most cases, I felt that was a good thing because it kept me on my game. Read More

HR Tech Today Is a Lot Like Pitching Credit Cards to Impulsive College Students

When you’re 18, it’s fair to assume that you know absolutely nothing about anything. What’s inconvenient is that most real knowledge really only comes in hindsight, which is about as useful as a majority of HR Tech ideas being floated in the industry at any given time.

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Back in the 1990’s, credit card “pushers” were visible in the student union on nearly every college campus in America. We were living in a time of ‘have fun now, pay later!’ and kids like me were their ideal target audience. We bit hungrily like fish who had been frozen in their parents’ lake of adolescence in suspended animation for 18 years.

Now we had access to our own credit, money, and bills to pay without anyone looking over our shoulders.

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5 Rules For Contacting Sourced Candidates

It seems, at times, that those of us in the recruiting profession can be slow to catch on to trends or common sense norms. It’s not something that is unique to only this industry, and it likely has more to do with the void of common sense in the world, more than it has womanto do with any particular industry.

One of the great mysteries of mankind is the omnipresent deficit of common sense when it comes to contacting candidates for the first time. For social creatures who have spent decades interacting with other humans, the basics of beginning a dialogue seem to evade many recruiters. And that inability to do so effectively has made the term recruiter anathema to many in-demand candidates in the market.

But the beautiful part of being cognizant humans is that we can learn and change our behavior. We can be better than we are today when we reach out to a candidate. In fact, we have to be, if we want to remain relevant. Because, you know, the AI robots are coming to take our jobs and stuff.

Here are a few things to remember before you hit send next time. Read More

Between The Lines: What Facebook Jobs Really Means for Real Recruiters.

If you’re in recruiting, I’m sure that by now you’re probably aware of the fact that as of last week, Facebook officially announced that they would be rolling out the ability for facebook-vs-linkedin-e1487725165620-300x251 (1)employers to post jobs on their Company Pages.

While this feature has been in beta for some months now, last week’s long awaited announcement marked the first public confirmation that Zuck & Co. was officially moving into the already crowded online recruiting space.

Facebook’s move into job postings has proven to be a contentious topic among many in the recruiting industry; some see a sourcing silver bullets, others pure anathema.

It will obviously take some time to determine whether Facebook’s most recent move towards world domination will make any sort of meaningful impact on the way candidates find jobs, and companies find candidates – or whether the platform will quickly go the way of Branchout, BeKnown by Monster, or any of the dozens of attempts to transform Facebook into a viable recruiting solution that ended, unilaterally, in abject failure.

As a tech recruiting leader, I remain cautiously optimistic about Facebook’s foray into talent acquisition. The fact that I’m actually a practitioner, responsible for filling reqs, is simultaneously also what’s causing me to approach this new offering with some skepticism.

Over the years, I’ve seen a ton of recruiting tools that were purportedly going to change the world of recruiting, and yet, ultimately, our world is more or less the same as it ever was.

So, while I’m excited about the prospect of Facebook finally getting into the recruiting game, I think that my cautious approach of “show me, don’t tell me is imminently justified (and rightfully expected). Read More

Learn To Live Without LinkedIn And Attend More Events In 2017

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Don’t you just love New Year’s and the fresh, clean slate that it brings you? January means new beginnings and a full 365 days of continual self-improvement, right? Yeah, me neither.

But a new year does mean new budgets, new searches to work on, and a whole new set of market changes and challenges. Which means that you’ll need to keep fine tuning your arsenal of tools, and stay on top of what’s being talked about in the market.

And I know, you’re already thinking “I don’t have time for more.” Well, that may well be true, but the only disservice you do is to yourself if you ignore your professional development. So, in the spirit of fresh starts, here’s a few things to put on your to-do list for 2017. You may not get to them all, but start with just one and take it from there. Read More

The Way Buying Should Be: Evaluating HR Technology

It’s confusing to me how we go through more than thirteen years of education without hrt1learning things we’ll need for the rest of our life – how to do our taxes, budgeting, how to get a loan, etc. We learn calculus and biology before we’re taught what we really need to get by and do well for ourselves. There are a lot of things we have to do in this world of adulting that we never get trained on if we don’t have parents who can teach us how to do them.

Buying technology, like a new car, is one of the many practical things we’re never taught in school. We go through life with check lists and blogs, scattered information comparing one thing to the next and trying to make the best decisions possible based on reviews. That’s why reviews are so popular in the first place, because we aren’t taught what to look for or how to be a better buyer.

It’s a lot like recruiting. In our job, there’s no specific education pipeline to teach us what to buy or why as compared to a more technical path where they’re taught every step of the job before ever leaving college. Unlike an engineer, we’re often left aimlessly wandering to decide priorities and how-to’s  in the school of the hard knocks. We don’t know everything we need to know before we start on this recruiting career path. One area we struggle the most to make good decisions? Technology. Read More

Salary Secrecy Law – “You’re Hired” Radio Show

I had the opportunity to spend some time with my colleague, Lorne Epstein and a few guests to debate the core principles of the Massachusetts salary law, and it’s effect on the recruiting industry.

Take a listen, hope you enjoy. I promise to dress up the next time I’m on the radio.

 

 

 

 

Busted: I Have Resume Bias

Ah, college. It’s where so many of those “this one time..” stories start, unless you attend a screen-shot-2016-09-01-at-10-33-10-amlot of open bar HR conference happy hours, of course. College is the place where you start to learn your story – personally and professionally. You being to refine those dreams and realize that maybe you don’t want to be a doctor or lawyer after all.

Upon graduation, 5 or more years later for most kids, you’re responsible for telling that story. For translating all of your learning and “work experience,” or lack thereof, into a cohesive and coherent resume. Of course, up to this point – you’ve never been taught to write a resume in the first place so your resume advice comes from an array of sources: family, friends, the Internet, of course. But many colleges also offer another resource, your college career center.

The first resume advice many of us get from an actual human is from that college career counselor. They’re supposed to be experts on careers, after all, and at the low price of $0 (if you ignore the tens of thousands you’ve already paid for college), they’re worth it.

I can almost hear the recruiters cringing now, especially those of us who have looked at a thousand resumes with the same formatting. The same mistakes. In general, we have a bit of mistrust towards these guys, often 20 plus year tenured veterans of the career counseling department. Our hesitance is valid considering they haven’t actually applied for a job since faxing in your resume was a thing at most companies. Read More

RecruitingLive: Your Questions Answered

2016-01-20_15-32-47-e1453325660540We had a great RecruitingLive session last week, and I wish we could have answered all the questions on the air. I felt that people who spent the time to look at my mug for 30 minutes deserved to get their questions answered, even if we couldn’t do so on the show. So, here’s my take on a few of the questions that came in last week.

Thanks again to everyone who took time out of their day to join. Read More

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