Recruiting In 3D

I’m not a great sourcer, BUT…

I am not an expert sourcer. Pony

That feels good to say, after so many years. I’m a good sourcer, but I’m not going to be building APIs and hacking into the back end of databases this week. This isn’t because I don’t have the curiosity to do so, but because my role expands beyond being a pure sourcer. In other words, it’s just part of my job, albeit a part of my job that I tend to love. This is mostly because nothing is more self-satisfying for me than finding gold among the internet rubble and coming out the other side with the right candidate. But time also gets in the way.

Aside from the usual suspects of time and desire, my role requires me to be able to provide a high-caliber end-to-end experience for the candidate as a representative of my company. We (like most other companies) run lean on the recruiting and sourcing side. Therefore, I have to make sure I’m covering all the angles and proverbially leaving no stone upturned. Sometimes, it’s better to be lucky than good, and I absolutely subscribe to that. But when I meet people newer to the recruiting industry, and more precisely the sourcing function therein, they often turn to tools first. And while logical, you still need to “crawl before you walk.” So many recruiters and sourcers want to be “in the know” with the latest and greatest, while forgetting, or outright not having mastered the basics. Hence, this is advice I give to new recruiters and sourcers. Read More

5 Rules For Contacting Sourced Candidates

It seems, at times, that those of us in the recruiting profession can be slow to catch on to trends or common sense norms. It’s not something that is unique to only this industry, and it likely has more to do with the void of common sense in the world, more than it has womanto do with any particular industry.

One of the great mysteries of mankind is the omnipresent deficit of common sense when it comes to contacting candidates for the first time. For social creatures who have spent decades interacting with other humans, the basics of beginning a dialogue seem to evade many recruiters. And that inability to do so effectively has made the term recruiter anathema to many in-demand candidates in the market.

But the beautiful part of being cognizant humans is that we can learn and change our behavior. We can be better than we are today when we reach out to a candidate. In fact, we have to be, if we want to remain relevant. Because, you know, the AI robots are coming to take our jobs and stuff.

Here are a few things to remember before you hit send next time. Read More

Learn To Live Without LinkedIn And Attend More Events In 2017

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Don’t you just love New Year’s and the fresh, clean slate that it brings you? January means new beginnings and a full 365 days of continual self-improvement, right? Yeah, me neither.

But a new year does mean new budgets, new searches to work on, and a whole new set of market changes and challenges. Which means that you’ll need to keep fine tuning your arsenal of tools, and stay on top of what’s being talked about in the market.

And I know, you’re already thinking “I don’t have time for more.” Well, that may well be true, but the only disservice you do is to yourself if you ignore your professional development. So, in the spirit of fresh starts, here’s a few things to put on your to-do list for 2017. You may not get to them all, but start with just one and take it from there. Read More

The Rise and Fall of LinkedIn: A Recruiting Requiem.

There’s nothing new about M&A in the HR Technology Industry; after all, big fish swallows little fish is how most top tier talent vendors have ended up
stream_imgso bloated they can hardly move, much less run at the same speed as the smaller SaaS startups starting to dominate the landscape.

I’m not naming names (Taleo) but let’s just say when you have a user conference headlined by Maroon 5, you’re basically printing your own money living in the past. Read More

The Emperor’s New Clothes: Lookup and the LinkedIn Talent Disconnect

Love it or hate it, LinkedIn is one of those companies that’s constantly tweaking their platform; that they put a ton more time and money back into their actual product than most HR Technology vendors, and make much more substantial updates to core features and functionalities than most online and SaaS companies, period.tumblr_mahxbaNXm91qc7mh1

The average active LinkedIn member (note: the “average” LinkedIn member, in fact, isn’t active on the website) a recent study suggested only around 37% log on at least once a month) spends a scant 17 minutes on the site every month, compared to over the over 20 minutes a day Facebook’s 1.3 billion users spend on site.

The average recruiter, by contrast, more or less lives on LinkedIn, which is why we’re so quick to catch even the most minor tweaks to functionality or the most subtle changes to the site’s UI/UX. Recruiters know LinkedIn better than anyone, which is why no one in this industry would deny the sheer level of work that goes into iterating current functionalities, introducing new features and experimenting with potential enhancements or revenue streams (remember CardMunch or Connected, anyone?).

This is why so many of us are so frustrated at the fact that what was once such an effective, disruptive and innovative recruiting technology has devolved into whatever the hell LinkedIn has become these days – although frankly, I’m not even sure the company itself knows what LinkedIn is supposed to be, anymore. While the amount of work that goes into the product is self-evident, exactly what the hell the point, or value, of this work actually is to its end users and customers, however, is another story entirely. Read More

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